PHILOSOPHY

Associate in Arts Degree: Philosophy

Philosophy is the activity of trying to make sense of our world through sustained and rigorous thinking about the most difficult questions rooted in the minds of human beings. Thus, the study of philosophy invites reflection upon, and analysis of, the nature of reality, value, and the self. Courses in philosophy offer students the opportunity for self-development and the building of a coherent view of world and culture. Majoring in philosophy is an excellent way to develop skill in argument analysis as well as critical reasoning, and thus is relevant to understanding problems and evaluating solutions in any area of study or employment. The study of philosophy is excellent preparation for careers in law, journalism, politics, and university teaching. Study in philosophy does not focus on what to think, but on how to think. Such a skill is applicable in any context. The program in Philosophy is designed as preparation for transfer to a four-year university with a major in Philosophy, Humanities, or any liberal arts discipline.

Student Learning Outcome:

Students will be able to critically engage with the world of ideas, both historical and contemporary, enabling them to interpret and understand their place in the world as citizens and active participants in the expression of human culture and values.

Program Requirements:

Units Required: 21
 

    Units
PHILOS-101 Introduction to Philosophy 3.0
     
Plus three units from the following:  
     
PHILOS-106 Critical Reasoning 3.0
PHILOS-230 Symbolic Logic 3.0
     
Plus three units from the following:  
     
PHILOS-120 Introduction to Ethics 3.0
PHILOS-240 Contemporary Moral Problems 3.0
     
Plus three units from the following:  
     
PHILOS-110 History of Early Philosophy 3.0
PHILOS-111 History of Philosophy-Renaissance Through the 19th Century 3.0
     
Plus three units from the following:  
     
PHILOS-102 Introduction to Eastern Religion & Philosophy 3.0
PHILOS-220 Introduction to Comparative Religion 3.0
PHILOS-225 Introduction to Philosophy of Religion 3.0
     
Plus three units from the following:  
     
PHILOS-112 History of Philosophy - 20th Century Philosophy 3.0
PHILOS-250 Environmental Ethics 3.0
     
PLUS three additional units from any of the above courses that have not yet been taken. 3.0


PHILOS 101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys major western and non-western philosophies, philosophical figures and philosophical issues,
including theory of knowledge, nature of reality, the mind/body problem, philosophy of religion, political
philosophy, and ethical theory.


PHILOS 102 INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Explores philosophies contained in Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto.


PHILOS 106 CRITICAL REASONING
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Introduces reasoning skills for evaluating and understanding arguments, including using deductive and inductive logic, identifying common fallacies and evaluating beliefs, claims, and forms of evidence. UC credit limitation: PHILOS-106 and SOCI-108 combined, maximum credit one course.


PHILOS 110 HISTORY OF EARLY PHILOSOPHY
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys ancient and medieval European philosophical thought from the pre-socratics through medieval philosophers, including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Anselm, Augustine, Abelard, and Aquinas.


PHILOS 111 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: RENAISSANCE THROUGH THE 19TH CENTURY
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through the 19th century, including the philosophical systems of empiricism, rationalism, skepticism, and idealism.


PHILOS 112 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - 20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys 20th and 21st century investigations into notions of human nature, the place of individuals in history, and the determination of value and choice. Topics include European existentialism (Nietzche, Sartre, Camus,etc.), analytical philosophy, and contemporary thinkers and movements.


PHILOS 120 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys some of the major classical and contemporary ethical theories with emphasis on their application to typical life situations in a modern society.


PHILOS 210 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Surveys some of the major classical and contemporary ethical theories with emphasis on their application to typical life situations in a modern society.


PHILOS 220 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE RELIGION
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
A philosophical overview and study of major world religions, eastern and western. Includes historical roots, major doctrines and figures, and central concerns.


PHILOS 225 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: PHILOS-101 or PHILOS-220

Surveys philosophical problems relating to religious belief. Topics include the existence of God, religious experience, the relationship between faith and reason, concepts of God, religion and ethics, miracles, religious language, the problem of evil, personal destiny, and religious diversity.


PHILOS 230 SYMBOLIC LOGIC
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: PHILOS-101

Introduces symbolism and methods of modern logic, including translation of arguments in English into formal logic, development of the idea of logical validity, evaluation of arguments by using truth tables and methods of natural deduction.


PHILOS 240 CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Introduces ethical theory and applied contemporary moral issues in areas such as medicine, business, health care, technology, and the environment.


PHILOS 250 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
Units: 3.00
UC:CSU 54.00 hours lecture
Recommended Preparation: PHILOS-101

Examines complex moral issues raised by our interactions with non-human animals and the natural world, including pollution, global warming, sustainability, ecofeminism, animal rights, Third World development, property rights, fossil fuel dependency, deep ecology, 'Green' politics, species preservation, rights and duties to nature, and the need for developing new, 'clean' technologies. These issues will be examined in light of ethical theories such as utilitarianism, deontological ethics, and social contract theory.


Planned Course Offerings 2011-2013

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