NEWS ARCHIVE​​​​​​
These outdated news releases and advisories are stored here for archival purposes. 

MARCH


March 26, 2004

Get Your Wine Classic Tickets Now ­Before Prices Go Up

Organizers of the Santa Clarita Valley Wine Classic, the region’s premier wine-tasting event and fundraiser for young musicians, are urging those who would like to attend the event to purchase their tickets before prices increase on April 1.

A couple purchasing two tickets, for example, will save $10 if they do so by March 31. Individual tickets cost $65 each until March 31, $70 if purchased April 1 through June 4. Ticket prices rise to $80 per person on June 5, the day of the event.

Ticket prices are as follows:
  • Through March 31: $65 each, $120 a pair
  • April 1 to June 4: $70 each, $130 a pair
  • At the door: $80 each, $150 a pair
  • Designated driver: $35 each
  • Group sales through May 21: $60 each (10 minimum)​
Organizers also are reminding attendees that this year’s event has relocated from its longtime home at California Institute of the Arts to College of the Canyons. The move is necessary to accommodate an event that has seen significant growth in recent years.

“The Wine Classic has become so popular and well-attended that we had no choice but to find a larger facility,” said Sue Bozman, executive co-director of the Wine Classic Committee. “The main room is much larger, with more space for people to spread out. It was not only a necessary transition, it was a good one.”

The 16th-annual event promises to be the biggest yet for wine connoisseurs and music lovers, offering a huge variety of wines from both wineries and merchants, gourmet food from some of the Santa Clarita Valley’s best restaurants and catering services, and live orchestral music. In addition to the latest releases poured by wineries, more than 50 library wines will be uncorked.

A wide selection of current and rare vintage wines will be offered during a silent auction, professional musicians will perform for guests, and vintage library wines will be available for tasting. All guests will receive souvenir glasses and trays.

The event, a fundraiser for the SCV Youth Orchestra and Santa Clarita Symphony, will be held 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, June 5, in the Physical Education Center at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia.

The SCV Youth Orchestra is a three-tiered instrumental educational program that was founded at CalArts in 1969 and moved to College of the Canyons in 1989. The program provides a positive and creative outlet for hundreds of young musicians throughout the Santa Clarita Valley.

The other beneficiary of the event is the Santa Clarita Symphony, which is dedicated to maintaining a professional symphony orchestra that will attract local audiences to symphonic music, strengthen music education in our schools, and inspire young and old to appreciate orchestral literature.


March 25, 2004

Seminar to Address Conflicts in Workplace

Techniques for investigating and resolving claims of workplace discrimination and harassment will be the focus of a special seminar designed for corporate managers. The seminar, scheduled Thursday, April 1, also will help managers create and maintain a workplace environment that reduces the likelihood of such claims.

“Who’s Telling the Truth in Workplace Discrimination & Harassment Investigations” will utilize actual examples and case studies to illustrate the proper ways to conduct investigations of such complaints, shed personal biases and avoid costly mistakes.

The breakfast seminar ­ one in a series of workshops designed to educate businesspeople about important and topical workplace issues ­ will be presented jointly by the Employee Training Institute (ETI) at College of the Canyons, the Valley Industrial Association (VIA) and Professionals in Human Resources Association (PIHRA).

“An important aspect of the seminars is to convey some crucial skills to managers who’ve climbed the corporate ladder quickly, but didn’t necessarily receive a formal education in communicating with employees effectively and within legal guidelines,” said Pamela Welden, director of ETI. “It’s important for managers to understand the constantly changing California laws that affect the outcomes of many types of employee requests and demands. These laws have heavy financial impacts on companies that violate them, skirt them or don’t show good faith as to their intent.”
To register or obtain more information, call (661) 259-3874.


March 25, 2004


Film Festival Focuses on Women in Cinema

College of the Canyons’ Annual International Film Festival this year focuses on award-winning foreign-language films from Spain, France, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, India and the United Kingdom. The public is welcome, and admission is free.

“Images of Women in Cinema,” which began on March 17, features screenings on selected Wednesdays and Thursdays through April 29. A discussion follows the screenings, which are presented in Room M-318 of the Media & Fine Arts Building.

Upcoming films include:

Earth
Written and directed by Deepa Mehta, India, 1998, English subtitles, 95 minutes

4 p.m. Wednesday, March 31

Presenter: Pamela Williams-Paez, Sociology Department
“Earth” is an intelligent and deeply moving personal account of the partition of India. At least 11 million people ­ Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs and others ­ caught on the wrong side of the dividing lines were driven from their homes. Some reports put the death toll from communalist pogroms and rioting at 1 million. Mehta’s film, based on Bapsi Sidhwa’s novel “Cracking India,” portrays this disaster through the eyes of an 8-year-old crippled child from Lahore, the Punjabi city that saw some of the bloodiest pogroms. The experiences, hopes and fears of this young girl provide an intense portrait of the period.

Lola Rennt!
Written and directed by Tom Tykwe, Germany, 1999, English subtitles, 81 minutes

3 p.m. Wednesday, April 14

Presenter: Lisa Wallace, English Department
In “Lola Rennt!” (Run, Lola, Run!), Lola (Franke Potente), with her wildly colorful punk style and glass-shattering scream, has 20 minutes to raise and deliver 100,000 Deutsche marks to save the life of her courier boyfriend Mannie (Moritz Bleibtreu) after he ineptly loses a bag of drug money on the subway. A pounding techno beat accompanies her mad dash across Berlin while a kaleidoscopic array of visual effects heightens the action: split-screen shots, instant replays, slow-motion footage, animation and shifts from 35mm to video. In a metaphysical musing on the vagaries of fate, Tykwe, who also co-composed the film’s electronic score, twice replays Lola’s frantic mission, each time with slight alterations in timing that lead to vastly different consequences. This original, heart-pounding, popular film “hit the ground sprinting,” as one critic noted, in its debut at the Venice Film Festival.

Heavenly Creatures

Directed by Peter Jackson, New Zealand, 1994, 108 minutes

4 p.m. Wednesday, April 21

Presenter: Ron Karlin, Library Department
“Heavenly Creatures” is a groundbreaking film and the first important work by the now-famous but then-obscure director Peter Jackson of “Lord of the Rings” fame. It’s the first film of the now-famous actress Kate Winslett (“Titanic”). And, it’s the first film that dealt unsparingly with the most notorious crime story in the history of New Zealand: the Parker-Hulme murder of the 1950s, a case that involved teenage perpetrators, matricide and lesbianism. From this event, Jackson created a work that far transcends the run-of-the-mill exploitation film that lesser talents might have made. It is a movie that allows viewers to look inside the complexity of the girls’ relationship with one another, eliciting not sympathy for the protagonists but rather very strong empathy. The film is challenging, riveting and unforgettable.

Jules et Jim
Directed by Francois Truffaut, France, 1962, English subtitles, 105 minutes

4 p.m. Wednesday, April 28

Presenter: Donna Davidson, Cinema Department
“Jules et Jim” (Jules and Jim)
 pits the importance of male friendship against the mysterious allure of the female. Truffaut’s claim that “monogamy is impossible, but anything else is worse” is depicted through two very good friends, Jim, a Frenchman, and Jules, an Austrian, who fall in love with the same woman, Catherine. World War I separates the two men, who fight for their respective countries. But the war pales in comparison to the turmoil that Catherine wreaks on their lives. Played by screen legend Jeanne Moreau, Catherine remains one of the most enigmatic and frustrating female protagonists in film history. Truffaut employs the concepts of the French New Wave in this less-than-idyllic romantic film.

Carmen
Directed by Carlos Saura, Spain, 1983, English subtitles, 102 minutes

4 p.m. Thursday, April 29

Presenter: Pierre Etienne, Foreign Languages Department
Finally! The only “Carmen” since Dorothy Dandridge who looks ­ and acts ­ like the sultry femme fatale that she is. This dazzling, Oscar-nominated interpretation of this classic will set your soul and feet on fire. A master dancer decides to produce a spectacle in which the myth of Carmen is retold through flamenco music and dance. As the dancers consume the stage with their pyrotechnics, a passion simmers in the wings, mimicking the plot of the original tragedy. The film is inspired by a novella (Merimee), an opera (Bizet) and an Edith Piaf song. Framed by the music of virtuoso guitarist Paco de Lucia and the breathtaking dancing of Laura del Sol, Antonio Gades and Cristina Hoya, this film will send you running to the COC Dance Department’s flamenco course and to Cobras & Matadors for tapas and manzanilla.​


March 24, 2004

Animation Students Draw Raves at Competition

Two College of the Canyons animation students received awards at the statewide California Community College Education and Workforce Development Media Arts Awards that accepted nearly 550 entries from 40 colleges in 11 different categories.

Both Lejon Douroux and Kristina Swanger were Merit Award winners in the “Traditional Animation” category. Douroux picked up an award for his piece entitiled “An Afternoon Drive” while Swanger won with her “Status Epilipticus.” The awards mark the first time College of the Canyons animation students have won in this competition.

“These films represent months of hard work and dedication,” said Animation Department Chairperson Sheila Sofian. “I am very excited for them both, and I am glad they are receiving the acknowledgement they deserve.”

Douroux, Swagger and other winners will be presented their awards during the Media Arts Showcase being held Thursday, March 25 at the Apple Store in Pasadena. Their works will also be shown, with an informal viewing starting at 4:30 p.m. and a formal presentation beginning at 6 p.m.


March 10, 2004

Vital Express Signs On as Major Sponsor of China Conference

Recognizing the emerging economic importance of trade with China, Valencia-based transportation company Vital Express has signed on as the major sponsor of an all-day conference that will allow businesspeople to meet directly with Chinese trade officials.

“Exploring Business with China: Challenges and Opportunities” promises to remove the veil of secrecy surrounding doing business with China, a country with nearly 1.3 billion people and a trillion-dollar economy that’s second only to the United States.

The conference will be held at the Hyatt Valencia’s Santa Clarita Conference Center on Wednesday, April 21. The center is located at 24500 Town Center Drive, Valencia.

“Our company will always maintain its local focus, but we also understand that our customers’ needs have an international reach,” said Lisa Boaz, chief executive officer of Vital Express. “Our business model has grown to meet the needs of our global clientele, and this conference is a perfect match for our global-expansion franchise plans.”

Vital Express, a warehouse, fulfillment, distribution and transportation company that specializes in same-day deliveries across the U.S., was founded in 1997 by Boaz and her husband Dan, who serves as company president. The fast-growing global logistics company also specializes in air freight, less-than-truckload and courier services.

The company’s business concept has caught on with an ever-expanding clientele, and both the couple and their business have received numerous industry accolades, ranging from the SCV Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year Award to the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce Leader of the Future Award.

The conference will feature industry and trade officials from both the U.S. and China, who will cover wide-ranging aspects of trade between the two countries. Topics include how to secure suppliers of materials and components; the advantages and risks of setting up operations; the market for U.S. goods, tools and machinery; exporting finished products and agriculture; how to obtain federal assistance in developing or expanding business; and case studies from companies that have succeeded in tapping into the Chinese market.

College of the Canyons is working with China’s National Planning & Reform Commission to coordinate the event. A number of Chinese government officials and international business consultants are scheduled to speak at the conference. Among them are Zhong Jianhua, consul general of China’s L.A. Consulate; Xuedong Zhang, vice director general of China’s Public Administration Society; Clare Cheng, chief executive director of 4In Brand Consulting of Shanghai; Zhiming Xu, director and chief representative for Shanghai Foreign Investment Development Board; Hua Lin, deputy director of the Institute of Economic Systems and Management; and Xuejun Zhang of the International Cooperation Center.

Other speakers slated to appear include Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich; Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook, superintendent-president of College of the Canyons; Vance Baugham, regional manager of the L.A. Economic Development Corp. (LAEDC); Martin Selander, international trade specialist for the Small Business Administration (SBA); Julianne Hennessey of the Department of Commerce; Rob Guthrie, business development officer for U.S. Export Import Bank; Tim Norris of Pan Pacific Sourcing; and John Hoskinson, president of Gruber Systems of Valencia.

“If resources such as this conference were available when we began our China journey, the cost and timeline would have been significantly improved,” said Gruber Systems’ Hoskinson. “This conference is a must for any company contemplating a global strategy or a need to maintain a competitive edge.”

Also to be covered is the importance of “guanxi,” the social aspects of Chinese business relationships that are so critical to success. Dr. Archie Kleingartner, director of the UCLA Anderson School of Business Global Windows Project and an expert on guanxi, will lead a session on understanding Chinese culture and its impact on business.

As a bonus, participants may attend a special reception following the event and speak directly with Chinese government officials involved with trade and investments, as well as conduct one-on-one meetings with Chinese officials in the two days following the conference.

The conference reflects the growing globalization of business that affects nearly every company in the Santa Clarita Valley and greater Los Angeles region, said Dena Maloney, dean of economic development at College of the Canyons.

“With China’s trillion-dollar economy becoming more accessible to foreign firms, many companies cannot ignore the vast opportunities and global challenge of the China market,” Maloney said. “The conference will allow business leaders to assess their readiness to enter the China market, establish important contacts and speak to experts about Pacific Rim trade.”

With the highest foreign direct investment in the world, the People’s Republic of China is fast becoming a focal point for businesses and industries seeking to expand their markets and bolster their bottom lines. The country’s GDP (gross domestic product) was estimated to be close to $6 trillion in 2002.

While China’s political controls remain tight, economic controls have become more and more relaxed in recent years. The government has gradually introduced market-oriented reforms and decentralized economic decision-making over the past 25 years.

In 1978 China’s leadership began moving the economy from a sluggish, Soviet-style central economy to a more market-oriented system in which the economic influence of non-state organizations and individual citizens has been steadily increasing, according to the U.S. government. The country switched to a system of household and village responsibility in agriculture instead of collectivization, increased the authority of local officials and plant managers in industry, permitted a wide variety of small-scale enterprises in services and light manufacturing, and opened the economy to increased foreign trade and investment.

The result has been a quadrupling of the GDP since 1978. In 2003 China stood as the second-largest economy in the world after the United States.
The conference is sponsored by the College of the Canyons Center for Applied Competitive Technologies in conjunction with the college’s Economic Development Division. The college is working with a variety of other organizations to present the conference, including the City of Santa Clarita, Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley, Santa Clarita Valley Economic Alliance, the Centers for International Trade Development, the Valley Industrial Association and Gruber Systems. Additional support is being provided through the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.


March 4, 2004

Spanish Language Institute Adds Travel Element

College of the Canyons’ popular, one-week Spanish Language Institute, to be held this August, is adding a second week that consists of a trip to Costa Rica. The travel element is designed to bring relevance and context to what is taught in the classroom. During the Costa Rica trip, students will not only practice their language skills, they will receive hands-on experience learning about the culture, geography and biology of the area, as well as learn about the history of the area from pre-Columbian times to the present.

An information meeting for potential participants will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 17, in the College of the Canyons Library, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Santa Clarita.

The one-week, on-campus language and culture segments will be held from Aug. 2 to 5, and the one-week travel segment will be held from Aug. 7 to 15. The college’s fall semester will begin on Monday, Aug. 16.

Students attending both sessions could earn up to nine units of college credit in biology, history and Spanish. It is possible to attend either one or both sessions, earning varying amounts of credit. The first week of the Spanish Institute will involve enrollment fees of $18 per unit (unless the state increases community college fees before that time), and the travel segment will cost $1,595, plus enrollment fees. The $1,595 covers round-trip air transportation from Los Angeles to San Jose, Costa Rica; seven nights in 4-star hotels; 12 meals; round-trip bus transfers; a half-day San Jose city tour; a half-day tour of Sarchi Pueblo; a full-day excursion to Manuel Antonio National Park, Monteverde Cloud Forest, the Arenal Volcano and Coter Rain Forest. Most service charges and taxes are included.

“This is an outstanding opportunity for students and community members to experience the richness and color of a vibrant and beautiful country,” said Claudia Acosta, a native of Nicaragua and chair of the Foreign Languages Department. “The educational elements of the trip provided by biologist Miriam Golbert and history professor Brad Reynolds will provide students a perspective about the country that few vacationers experience.”
Golbert will provide students with a unique look at contemporary issues in environmental biology in Costa Rica and help students to understand conservation and biological diversity in the area. She is an associate professor of biology at College of the Canyons and holds a master’s degree in cellular and molecular biology and a doctorate in education.

Reynolds is chair of the history department at College of the Canyons and is a specialist in U.S., Caribbean and Central American history. He earned his Ph.D. in history from USC and will instruct on the history, customs, economic and political development of Costa Rica and Latin America.

This travel program is one of many that College of the Canyons has on the drawing board, and it recognizes the growing trend in adding these kinds of experiences to college curricula nationwide.


March 3, 2004

It’s All About Reading at College Literacy Fair

A Literacy Fair aimed at children in grades Pre-K-6 will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, April 17, 2004, at College of the Canyons.

The fair will include a variety of activities and games related to selected children’s books. A number of workshops for both parents and children, oriented towards encouraging reading and improvement of study skills among young people, will be presented. The event is sponsored by the College of the Canyons Student California Teacher Association (SCTA), the Future Educator Club (FEC), COC TEACH Program and Santa Clarita California Teachers Association (SCCTA).

The Literacy Fair’s overall intent is to demonstrate to children and parents alike, that every activity we enjoy in life is enhanced by reading. Activities at the Literacy Fair include painting, making books, and more. These events are based on the books read at the Fair and will reinforce the strong ties between reading and enjoyable activities.

The SCCTA will be conducting a MegaSkills Seminar, a condensed version of the more comprehensive program held during the school year. This training is provided for parents to help develop their child’s confidence and self-esteem, as well as providing tips for parents on ways to assist their child with everyday homework.

According to Project Chair, Deborah Lockett, “This event will have significant benefits for those who attend.”

Admission to the fair is free and lunch for the children will be available for $3.00, payable at the door. The Future Educator Club has received a grant from the National Education Association to help pay for materials, but additional funds are needed in the following areas:
  • To provide a book or a Borders gift certificate for each child who attends.
  • To provide lunch for parents.
  • To purchase materials needed for activities (i.e. paint, paper, and paste/glue).

March 2, 2004

Symphonic, Jazz and Clarinet Concert Slated March 12

A solid sampling of some swingin’ music will ring out from the College of the Canyons student center next Friday night as the college's Symphonic Band, Jazz Band and Clarinet Choir gather together for a winter concert.

Starting at 7:30 pm, the concert will feature a harmonious blend of everything from popular music to jazz standards. The legendary Dirk Fisher will be on hand to conduct the Jazz Band, while College of the Canyons Music Director K.C. Manji will direct the Symphonic Band and Billy Kerr will conduct the Clarinet Choir. Alice Aguilar will be the featured vocalist.


March 1, 2004

Nurse-Training Collaborative Gets $400,000 Boost

College of the Canyons has received a $400,000 challenge grant to help fund an innovative three-year pilot program that addresses the critical statewide nursing shortage on a regional level.

The grant from the Weingart Foundation will help launch the Associate Degree Nursing Regional Collaborative, a cooperative effort among College of the Canyons, four other community colleges and at least 10 hospitals to increase the number of registered nurses.

“We’re very fortunate that the Weingart Foundation recognized this unique and viable approach that will help solve the nursing shortage in our region,” said Sue Albert, dean of allied health at College of the Canyons. “It is designed to create a more diverse nursing pool and support the needs of employers and students.”

The grant can be used only for the collaborative’s equipment, and a matching amount must now be raised for the Weingart Foundation funding to be granted.

The collaborative, led by College of the Canyons, will create a new first-year nursing program that will be developed and shared by Los Angeles Valley College, L.A. Pierce College, Glendale College and Ventura College.

Most colleges have waiting lists of prospective nursing students, illustrating the fact that there is no shortage of applicants. Rather, colleges are unable to accommodate those on waiting lists because of a lack of faculty, space and equipment. The collaborative will transform those waiting lists into nursing students who can be advanced into the workforce.

The need for nurses is critical. Not only is California dead-last nationally in the ratio of nurses to patients, state and health-care officials project a statewide shortfall of 25,000 nurses by 2006.

Partner colleges will develop the curriculum in partnership. College and hospital officials have already begun developing a shared curriculum that will be implemented in this fall. Courses also will be offered via video teleconferencing at hospitals, which also will provide skills lab space.

Key to the program’s success is the securing of adequate funding. The program’s projected cost is about $1.8 million. Several hospitals have committed $235,000 to the program so far. They include Providence Holy Cross, which contributed $100,000; Providence St. Joseph’s, $100,000; Northridge Hospital Medical Center, $25,000; and Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, $10,000.

College of the Canyons is pursuing additional funding sources.

Launching of the collaborative means students now on waiting lists can be enrolled in the program and acquire first-year nursing skills and knowledge, then fill vacancies in second-year courses at the partner college of their choosing.

Associate degree nursing programs, such as those offered at College of the Canyons and other community colleges, are the primary source for registered nurses in California. Such programs produce more than two-thirds of the registered nurse graduates in the state every year.


March 1, 2004

College Honors Newhall Land Executive for Community Service

Gary Cusumano, chief executive officer of The Newhall Land & Farming Co., has been named the recipient of the 2004 Silver Spur Community Service Award. Cusumano will be presented with the recognition during a black-tie gala at the California Club in Los Angeles on March 13.

“Gary is the logical choice to receive this special recognition because of his generous community service and his numerous contributions to the betterment of life in the Santa Clarita Valley,” said Kathleen Maloney, executive director of the College of the Canyons Foundation. “He’s one of those people who not only leads an important local company, he directs his time and passion toward worthwhile causes that improve our quality of life.”
Past honorees include Jay and Joyce Rodgers, longtime local developers and philanthropists, in 2003; Tom Lee, past CEO of Newhall Land, in 2002; business and community leader Lou Garasi in 2001; and business leader education advocate Michael Berger in 2000.

The annual Silver Spur Awards Banquet will be held at the California Club in Los Angeles on Saturday, March 13. The event is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Tickets cost $200 per person and can be purchased by calling (661) 362-3639.


March 1, 2004

Conference to Share Tips on Trading with China

College of the Canyons will present a special conference in April that promises to remove the veil of secrecy surrounding doing business with China, a country with nearly 1.3 billion people and a trillion-dollar economy.

“Exploring Business with China: Risks & Opportunities” is an all-day conference that will be held at the Hyatt Valencia’s Santa Clarita Conference Center on April 21. Industry and trade officials from the U.S. and China will come together to brief participants on many aspects of trade between the two countries, including:
  • Securing suppliers of materials and components
  • Advantages and risks in setting up operations
  • Market for U.S. goods, tools and machinery
  • Exporting finished products and agriculture
As a bonus, participants may attend a reception following the event and speak directly with Chinese government officials involved with trade and investments.

“Every business and industry leader who wants to expand their market in a dramatic way should make it a priority to attend this event,” said Dena Maloney, the college’s dean of economic development. “Although the information to be shared will be extremely valuable, I can’t stress enough the importance of the business contacts and relationships that can be developed through this event.

“It will undoubtedly be one of Southern California’s most exciting business conferences.”

Reservations may be made by calling (661) 259-3874. More information is available on-line at http://www.canyons.edu/offices/cact/china.htm. The conference is sponsored by the college’s Center for Applied Competitive Technologies in conjunction with the Economic Development Division.

With the highest foreign direct investment in the world, the People’s Republic of China is fast becoming a focal point for businesses and industries seeking to expand their markets and bolster their bottom lines. The country’s GDP (gross domestic product) was estimated to be close to $6 trillion in 2002.

While China’s political controls remain tight, economic controls have become more and more relaxed in recent years. The government has gradually introduced market-oriented reforms and decentralized economic decision-making over the past 25 years.

In 1978 China’s leadership began moving the economy from a sluggish, Soviet-style central economy to a more market-oriented system in which the economic influence of non-state organizations and individual citizens has been steadily increasing, according to the U.S. government. The country switched to a system of household and village responsibility in agriculture instead of collectivization, increased the authority of local officials and plant managers in industry, permitted a wide variety of small-scale enterprises in services and light manufacturing, and opened the economy to increased foreign trade and investment.

The result has been a quadrupling of the GDP since 1978. In 2003 China stood as the second-largest economy in the world after the United States, according to the CIA World Fact Book. Agriculture and industry have posted major gains, and the country has benefited from a huge expansion in internet use. Foreign investment remains a strong element in China's remarkable economic growth.


March 1, 2004

Popular Wine-Tasting Event Moves to New Location on June 5

The Santa Clarita Valley Wine Classic, the region’s premier wine-tasting event and fundraiser for young musicians, will move to a new home this year.

After 15 years at California Institute of the Arts, the event will move down the street to College of the Canyons on June 5.

“The Wine Classic has become so popular and well-attended that we had no choice but to find a larger facility,” said Sue Bozman, executive co-director of the Wine Classic Committee. “The main room is much larger, with more space for people to spread out. It was not only a necessary transition, it was a good one.”

The 16th-annual event promises to be the biggest yet for wine connoisseurs and music lovers, offering a huge variety of wines from both wineries and merchants, gourmet food from some of the Santa Clarita Valley’s best restaurants and catering services, and live orchestral music. In addition to the latest releases poured by wineries, more than 50 library wines will be uncorked.

A wide selection of current and rare vintage wines will be offered during a silent auction, professional musicians will perform for guests, and vintage library wines will be available for tasting. All guests will receive souvenir glasses and trays.

The event, a fundraiser for the SCV Youth Orchestra and Santa Clarita Symphony, will be held 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, June 5, in the Physical Education Center at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia.

“We’ve been getting a tremendous response from the wineries,” Bozman said. “It looks like this year’s event will be the biggest one yet.”
The SCV Youth Orchestra is a three-tiered instrumental educational program that was founded at CalArts in 1986 and moved to College of the Canyons in 1989. The program provides a positive and creative outlet for hundreds of young musicians throughout the Santa Clarita Valley.

The other beneficiary of the event is the Santa Clarita Symphony, which is dedicated to maintaining a professional symphony orchestra that will attract local audiences to symphonic music, strengthen music education in our schools, and inspire young and old to appreciate orchestral literature.
Both the Youth Orchestra and the Symphony are directed by Robert Lawson, a member of the music faculty at College of the Canyons and chair of the Music Department at Ventura College.
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