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About the Exhibition

 
 

Jessica Wimbley: Belle Jet and Cabinet Cards


Main Gallery, Mentry Hall 108
February 3 – March 26, 2020

Artist in Residence: February 24th to February 27th

Artist Talk: February 26th, 2:30pm - view link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8stfaobAUI

Merging memory, biology, culture and history, Jessica Wimbley investigates identity through portraiture. Using poet Audre Lorde’s term biomythography (a literary form that blends elements of autobiography, the novel, and personal mythology) as an interdisciplinary approach, Wimbley creates mixed media works combining painting, photography, drawing, performance and digital media to challenge the complexities of race and narrative in the American imagination.

Jessica Wimbley: Belle Jet and Cabinet Cards was curated by Pamela Bailey Lewis.  This exhibition and the 2nd Annual College of the Canyons Artist Residence Program were made possible by the support of the COC Foundation’s Patrons of the Arts, the Associated Students, and the Visual and Performing Arts Department.

Patrons of the Arts       ASG    Visual and Performing Arts

The COC Art Gallery is indebted to many individual and departments. My thanks goes first to Jessica Wimbley for so generously sharing her work and her time with us.  I am also very grateful to Vivian Lainfiesta, Dean Jenn Smolos, Ashley Murphy, Daniel Lewis, Annika Lüsse, Joe Kemp, Nick Pavik, Shawn Irwin, Rob Comeau, Mary Angelino, Stephanie Corral, Repographics, Technology Services, and the African American/Black Student Alliance for their support.

-Pamela Lewis

 

 Exhibition Images

 Jessica Wimbley
 
 Jessica Wimbley
 Jessica Wimbley
 

Jessica Wimbley

Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

 
Jessica Wimbley
Jessica Wimbley

 

Jessica Wimbley

Wimbley’s video references research and documentary film footage of the same title, created by Zora Neale Hurston in the 1920s and 1930s.

For many, Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960) is best known for her creative writing. But she was also an anthropologist and described using anthropology as an “illuminating lens” through which to research communities – a metaphor embraced by many anthropologists of the day. However, Hurston departed from convention in her choice of subject matter. She proposed studying her own people – an idea that ran counter to anthropological method of the day. Her approach to her work, that of a “participantobserver” in the black communities she chronicled in Florida, New Orleans, Haiti, and Jamaica, was modeled on that of her teacher Franz Boas, widely considered one of the most important anthropologists of all time.

Hurston used her anthropological fieldwork to debunk stereotypes about black people and to dismiss the idea that black cultures were inferior. Her research was pioneering in its efforts to theorize the effects of the African diaspora. Hurston was interested in the ways that culture shapes personality, and also how African cultural patterns were retained in African American cultures. Hurston’s studies of African American folklore were vivid and innovative. They emphasized African Americans’ connections to African ancestry, and argued that its rich and complex tradition helped blacks adapt to the New World.
 
 
 

 Jessica Wimbley Artist Talk

 

Download Denise M Johnson Essay

 

 
 Jessica Wimbley

 artist link: https://www.jessicawimbley.com/

 press links:
https://www3.canyons.edu/offices/pio/mondayreport/030220/wimbley.html
 

 

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Jessica Wimbley
Jessica Wimbley